Monday, February 27, 2017

BOOK REVIEW: COURT OF VAMPIRES BY MEGAN LINSKI




COURT OF VAMPIRES (The Shifter Prophecy, #1)
BY: MEGAN LINKSKI


PUBLISHED: January 31st 2017 by Kindle Press

PURCHASED: Kindle Unlimited Purchase

GENRES: Paranormal, Vampires, Werewolves, Witches, Fantasy, Russian History & Royalty, Romance, Action, YA / Young Adult

RATING: 3.8 Stars

OVERVIEW:
Vampires and werewolves shouldn’t fall in love.

Lysandra was born for one reason; to kill shifters. Princess of vampires, the heir to Vlad Dracula’s throne and the last descendant of Princess Anastasia, Lysandra lives in a castle of witches and human slaves,engaged to a dark vampire prince and prophesied as the one who will end the war between vampires and werewolves forever. 

Everything changes when Lysandra finds a dying werewolf. She takes him into her care and quickly falls in love, unable to explain the magical connection between them. If she’s discovered, she will be put to death. But how can she stop the war when her worst enemy is her true love?

A heart-stopping love story filled with shocking twists, Court of Vampires is a thrilling young adult fantasy that readers will devour over and over again. The legend of what really happened to the Romanov family is retold in Megan Linski's newest haunting paranormal romance.


REVIEW:
I was incredibly pumped to see how the cornucopia of ideas would coalesce into a delicious novel. Combining vampires, werewolves, witches and European history? Yes, please.



The ideas were solid, but the delivery needs work.


The mechanics of the relationships was odd and inorganic. First, the humans are suppose to be "less than" but Lysandra's servant goes to school with her. Lidia does not act like a servant, but a petulant step sister. 



She's hung out reading magazines, going to school, and interacted with other Royalty. And I mean she acted like she could end up being one of them. She certainly never was seen being the lowly servant she was suppose to be. 

Second, the flow of the relationships was confusing. Her fiance acts all Doe eyed at her despite being apart for four years. Her relationship with Lisar started out organically, but Megan fast forwarded the relationship and ended up with a weird situation.



If they were so comfortable with each other, how did it end up so uncertain and disjointed? That leads me to my last issues with the book, dialogue.

The dialogue and reactions were the most distracting for me. Lisar and Lysandra had a good dialogue going, then when things start to heat up, it becomes inorganically awkward. Some of the conversations became prepubescent. I can't give away too much, but I will say that Lysandra would act like the 18 year old she was and then more like a 12 year old. What then upset me was they jumped to very mature situations, which made the whole scene a jumbled mess. 


 

The servant and royal interactions were in complete opposition to the mythology initially set up. Lidia is suppose to be a lowly human and yest she rolls her eyes at Lysandra saying "Now you want to hang out. Perfect." She goes to say, "I can't believe you manipulated Valentina into this." I understand that they were friends, but Lidia takes major liberties and risks with her flippant behavior towards the Princess. I felt confused the whole book.



Her grandfather was the cleanest, most edited and structured character. He was well defined and showed some depth. There really wasn't any character development. The characters never changed their core or made any gains. 

That said, I love the Romeo and Juliet theme applied to books. Which is ironic because I don't like Romeo and Juliet themselves, but the idea of lovers torn apart by opposing sides. I was hoping for more meat on the mythology and the relationship development of the two main protagonists. 

I had moments where I felt some connection to the characters. There was some tension felt in scenes, especially towards the end. The story had great bones, an intriguing back story and mythology. It unfortunately needed more fine tuning on the dialogue and maturation of characters.